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via EEWMagazine/Ann Landry:

We live in a day and age where everyone wants to tell their truth–to be open and to be heard. But this is not always the wisest route.

Take the case of Ayesha Curry, Christian chef, cookbook author, and wife of NBA player Stephen Curry, for example. Her recent revelations that she desires male attention outside her marriage and feels insecure because many beautiful women compete for her megastar spouse’s affection, created chaos, drama, and widespread misunderstanding online.

Curry’s moment of transparency on the Jada Pinkett-Smith hosted web series, “Red Table Talk,” was analyzed, mocked, and turned into Internet fodder. When she said it “bothered” her that she received “zero male attention,” she was roundly criticized all over the Internet, with most critics casting the 30-year-old restaurateur as an attention-starved, needy, low-self-esteem-suffering, spoiled, ungrateful, rich housewife.

Many asked, why would a Christian wife be worried about what men, who are not her husband, think about her? Curry’s casual chat undeniably turned into a PR disaster. A moment of deep self-reflection backfired, proving that some conversations are best suited for prayer, or even private therapy sessions

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Ayesha Curry Teaches Us That In The Age Of Oversharing, Transparency Is Not Always Best was originally published on praisecleveland.com

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